Posts tagged ‘crisp’

April 9, 2012

Dry Rubbed Seared Salmon

It’s officially springtime, and with Easter passing I’m beginning to go through my lighter dishes to go with the change of seasons.  I get giddy thinking about fresh grilled corn on the cob, summer salads full of fresh veggies, pears, apples and toasted nuts, and most of all the selection of fresh fish in the local market.  One of my all time favorites is salmon, however, one badly cooked salmon can turn me off for months, so I have to choose wisely when I dine out.  The dry, chalky taste of overcooked salmon is one of the most devastating things you can be met with at the dinner table.  Similar to a burnt cookie, overcooked pasta, or a hockey puck steak, overcooked salmon is a major offense in my book.  But when it’s done well, you’ll want to have it every day of the week.  The beauty of salmon is that it can pick up a variety of flavors, teriyaki, garlic, white wine and butter, and its meaty texture lends itself to a variety of cooking methods.  I don’t recommend cooking Dover sole on the BBQ, but a salmon can stand up to this summer time classic.

The delicate crispy, golden crust that forms on the outside is a perfect contrast to the juicy, meaty flesh.  It’s a symbol of summer and health, and gets you on the track to looking stunning in your new summer swimsuit.

Perfect pan-seared salmon demands on a very hot pan. Use a heavy cast-iron skillet, which heats evenly. Warm the pan before you add the oil – either extra light virgin olive oil or vegetable oil; this trick allows the pan to get it really hot without burning the oil. A preheated pan also requires less oil.  Once you master this method you’ll be able to whip up a gourmet dinner in less than 10 minutes – golden brown outside and tender inside.   I like to serve salmon with a fresh mixed green salad with a tangy vinaigrette, a refreshing contrast to the rich, yet delicate fish.

Ingredients

  • 2 6 oz. salmon fillets (skin on) one per person
  • 1 tsp. garlic powder
  • 1 tsp. fresh thyme, finely chopped
  • 1 tsp. fresh rosemary, finely chopped
  • 1 tsp. sea salt
  • 1 tsp. freshly ground black pepper, coarse grind
  • 1 tsp. lemon pepper
  • 1 tsp. ground ginger
  • 1 tbsp. butter
  • 2 tbsp. extra light olive oil
  • 2 tsp. fresh parsley, finely chopped

Method

  1. In a small bowl, mix garlic powder, rosemary, thyme, seal, pepper, lemon pepper, and ginger.
  2. Brush the salmon with olive oil on all sides.
  3. Take the spice mixture and generously coat both sides of the salmon.
  4. Set a large cast-iron skillet over high heat. When a drop of water skitters on the surface, add the oil.
  5. Tilt the pan to coat the bottom evenly and heat until the oil is almost smoking, about 30 seconds.
  6. Place the salmon skin side up in the cast iron skillet.
  7. Cook until golden brown on the bottom, about 4 minutes.
  8. Turn the salmon and cook an additional 3 to 4 minutes on the other side.
  9. Then lower heat to medium, place lid over skillet to trap heat and finish cooking an additional 2-3 minutes.
  10. With a minute to go, add a tbsp. of butter and let is melt in the pan, spoon it over the top of the salmon right before you turn off the heat.
  11. To check if the salmon in ready, stick a thin knife in the thickest part and gently look at the color inside.  It should be juicy and barely turning opaque.  If you over cook the fish it will be extremely dry and very white in color.
  12. When salmon is cooked enough to eat safely it will lose its translucency and become opaque. It should also flake easily when tested with a fork.
  13. Serve with a fresh salad and enjoy your very healthy yet tasty dinner!

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January 23, 2012

Home Style Cornbread

There’s one thing that goes perfectly with BBQ ribs, chili or stew… golden, buttery, right-out-of-the-oven cornbread.  And there’s one thing that will take your ordinary cornbread from delicious to spectacular.  A cast iron skillet.  The traditional southern technique ensures you’ll enjoy melt in your mouth, deliciously crisp edges and pillowy centers of sweet goodness.

I like a slightly sweet, buttery cornbread with a moist center.  I also like to add a can of corn which result in chewy kernels dotted throughout the bread.  The biggest secret to good cornbread is don’t over mix.  It’s our natural impulse to mix things til their silky smooth.  This is exactly what you want when you’re making Hollandaise sauce, whipped cream, or icing sugar; but bread batter is delicate.  Save those arm muscles for when you’ll really need it, and for this recipe mix just enough to moisten the batter.  I always serve this with my homemade chili as a perfect vehicle to mop up all the extra juices, and I usually don’t have much to save for the next day.

Ingredients

  • 1 1/2 cup medium ground cornmeal
  • 1 cup all-purpose flour
  • 3/4 cup granulated sugar
  • 1/2 tsp. salt
  • 2 tsp. baking powder
  • 2 eggs, beaten
  • 1 can corn, drained
  • 1 1/2 cup whole milk
  • 1/2 cup butter, melted (with a small tab on reserve)
  • 1 tsp. extra virgin olive oil

Method

  1. Preheat oven to 450°F
  2. In a large bowl mix together dry ingredients: cornmeal, flour, sugar, salt and baking powder.
  3. In a separate bowl mix together wet ingredients: can of corn, eggs, milk, butter and olive oil.  Reserve a small tab of butter to heat in skillet and create a nice crust on the bottom.
  4. Slowly add in the wet ingredients to the larger bowl and mix gently.  Do not over mix the batter, just mix enough to combine ingredients.  Don’t worry about a few lumps, if you over mix your cornbread will come out dense.  You want fluffy cornbread!
  5. Heat a heavy bottom iron skillet on high and add a tsp of oil and a tab of butter.
  6. When the skillet is hot, pour in the batter.  It should sizzle in the pan, which will ensure crispy edges and utter happiness.
  7. Let it cook for a minute, then put it in the oven to bake
  8. Bake for 20-25 minutes, or until golden brown.
  9. Cut into wedges, squares or sticks and serve with chili or softened butter.

Adjust the amount of sugar depending on your taste.  I like it more on the sweeter side but most of my family likes it a little more savory.  I usually win, as I’m the one making it!  ENJOY and happy cooking!

November 18, 2011

Homemade Waffles with Nutmeg Whipped Cream

All it takes is a rush of cold air after a potent October cold front, on the heels of blustery northerly winds, to quickly change the weather in Texas.   Add in clear skies overnight allowing the heat to escape into space and voilà, very cold morning temperatures will be there to wake you.  In preparation for these cold blasts, I have something to warm your mornings, and leave you setting your alarm clock a few minutes early.

Adult waffles.  That’s right, not your usual Eggo mini waffles, but grown up, spruced up, adult waffles.  You still feel like a kid when you eat them, but with the touch of a few ingredients they transform into something decadent.  I love the slight crisp of the outside paired with the warm, fluffy center.  You can put almost anything on a waffle and it makes it better… berries, cream, butter, sugar, and syrup, even CHICKEN!  Ok, I didn’t grow up in the South and this dish totally confuses me, but I know it’s a favorite for some of you.  This recipe is in honor of my boyfriend who calls on these fluffy treats every Sunday morning.  And don’t worry, if you decide to go with Bisquick I won’t tell, I tend to go that route on busy weekends, and save these for special occasions.   P.S. You’ll be amazed what a little almond extract will do to your waffles, I promise it’s worth a try.

Ingredients

Waffle batter

  • 2 cups all-purpose flour
  • 1/8 cup sugar
  • 1 tsp. baking powder
  • 1 tsp. baking soda
  • 2 large eggs
  • 2 cups buttermilk (can also use milk if you don’t want to make a special trip)
  • 2 tbsp. vegetable oil
  • 1/4 tsp. real vanilla
  • 1/4 tsp. almond extract
  • Vegetable spray for waffle iron
  • Butter for topping

Whipped cream

  • 1 1/2 cup heavy whipping cream
  • 1 tbsp. confectioners sugar
  • 1/2 tsp. nutmeg

Method

  • Whip cold heavy whipping cream, confectioners sugar and nutmeg in a metal bowl.  Make sure the cream is super cold; warm cream is much harder to whip.
  • With an electric hand mixer beat cream (you can use a hand whisk; it just will take longer). Start slowly; if you set it on high at first, you’ll have cream all over the place. Set the mixer so it goes as fast as possible without splashing.
  • As the cream thickens, turn the speed up. As it begins to foam, start checking for a soft peak, which is what you want. The peak should bend over at the top when you remove the whisk. As it gets close, slow down, because if it goes too far, it will clump and separate (essentially become butter)
  • When finished, place Saran wrap over bowl and place in cold fridge (good luck, it’s always a game trying to get everything to fit, and inevitable the milk or orange juice has to come out.
  • Preheat your waffle iron
  • In a large mixing bowl mix flour, sugar, baking powder and baking soda
  • In a separate bowl, mix eggs, almond extract, vanilla, buttermilk and oil, then and add to the dry ingredients.
  • Let stand for 3-5 mins so batter thickens
  • Spray iron with oil
  • Spoon out about 1/2 cup of batter into hot iron (more or less depending on your waffle iron)
  • Remove from iron when ready-light turns on and top with whipping cream, a small knob of butter and a dusting of powdered sugar

You’ll be waking up earlier and earlier for these!  Add toppings and fillings to make them your own.  I usually add mini chocolate chips to my boyfriends waffle and then he carefully pours pure Vermont maple syrup into the cracks.  I like mine plain with whipped cream, but the best thing about waffles is the flavor combinations are endless.

November 9, 2011

Hummus with Homemade Pita Chips

Hummus is one of my go to’s when organizing my list for party snacks.  It’s far healthier than the traditional ranch dip (although that does have it’s place at times) and packs huge flavor in a small bite.  It’s also an impeccable match for vegetables, breads, chips…. pretty much anything you like to dip.  It’s one of those dishes that will leave you with a perfectly clean bowl and happy, full stomachs after every party.

Hummus is a Middle Eastern spread or dip made with chickpeas, which are also known as garbanzo beans.  By themselves, I’m definitely not a fan, in fact, I hate them.  I pick them out of soups and salads, and toss them away without the littlest thought.  I find them mealy, dry and flaky and have no need for them.  But all blended up in the food processor with some other goodies and they make a fantastically good dip!  I can’t resist the creamy deliciousness that makes simple pita turn into a delicacy.  Serve it with some olives and a glass of wine and you’ll feel like you’re on a Greek vacation… ok, maybe that’s a slight exaggeration but it will make your ordinary Tuesday something special.

Ingredients

  • 2 cans garbanzo beans, drained
  • 1/2 cup toasted pine nuts
  • 4 cloves garlic
  • 1/3 cup olive oil
  • 1/3 cup water
  • 1 tsp. sesame seed oil
  • 1 tsp. salt
  • 1 tsp. cumin
  • 1/2 tsp. paprika
  • 1/2 tsp. freshly ground pepper
  • 2 tbsp. lemon juice, about 1/2 lemon
  • Handful fresh cilantro

Method

  1. Preheat oven to 350 degrees F.
  2. Line baking tray with foil, and spread the pine nuts out
  3. Once oven is preheated, toast pine nuts for 10 mins.  Keep your eye on them; if your oven runs hot or it’s touchy, you’ll want to check on them after 6-8 minutes to make sure they don’t burn.  You can also do this in a dry skillet on medium heat.
  4. Once they turn golden remove from oven and let cool for 5-10 minutes
  5. Add all ingredients with the exception of 1 tbsp. pine nuts and cilantro to the food processor.  The reserved pine nuts will be your garnish
  6. Pulse on high for 30 seconds until mixture is well blended
  7. Add cilantro and pulse a few more times until cilantro is incorporated
  8. If the mixture is too thick, add a little more water or olive oil, this is the time to taste it to see if the salt and spices are at the right level.  Add a little more salt if needed but be careful, you can’t take back
  9. Scoop hummus into serving bowl and garnish with the remaining pine nuts and a little olive oil
  10. Serve with chips, pita bread, jicama, or carrots…. Anything you like to dip!

If you’re feeling like really treating yourself, you can make homemade pit chips to go with your hummus.  They beat the ones from the store any day.

Ingredients

  • 1 bag fresh pita (white or whole wheat)
  • 4 tbsp.
  • 1/2 tsp. salt
  • 1/2 freshly ground black pepper

Method

  1. Preheat heat oven to 375 degrees F.
  2. Cut pita bread into 8 wedges
  3. Pour olive oil into a bowl and brush pita chips with olive oil on both sides.
  4. Sprinkle with salt and pepper.
  5. Arrange pita chips on baking sheet and bake for 12 to 15 minutes until golden brown

 

November 5, 2011

Sautéed Corn and Water Chestnut Salad

Water chestnuts are a texture food, and are prized for their crispness.   They add a great crunch and slight earthiness to any salad, stir fry, or curry, and are a good source of potassium and fiber.  When rummaging through my pantry the other night for something to add to my corn salad, I was excited to come across a can tucked way back in the corner.

Corn brightens any meal and it´s one of the most loved of all vegetables (at least it is for me).  What can I say, I’m a corn addict, I love its naturally sweet taste, crisp bite and flavorful center.  So in my effort to whip up something more interesting than steamed corn, I pulled a few ingredients together, tossed them in a pan, and 10 minutes later I had a gourmet side dish.  I love that sweet corn turns a bit nutty when it’s sautéed, and the sweet flavor and crunchy texture of water chestnuts gives this dish a unique quality.

As the weather gets cooler, I’m always searching for warm side dishes over a summery salad, and this was an unexpected discovery.  It would also make for a great topping for acorn or spaghetti squash, or a side to a juicy steak or meatloaf.

Ingredients

  • 1 bag of frozen corn (or 2 cans of corn)
  • 1/2 yellow onion, finely diced
  • 1 can sliced water chestnuts, roughly chopped
  • 1-2 tbsp extra virgin olive oil
  • 1 tsp. salt
  • 1 tsp. freshly ground pepper
  • 1 tsp. garlic powder
  • Handful fresh cilantro, roughly chopped

Method

  1. Heat a medium size skillet with oil on medium heat
  2. Add onions and sprinkle with salt, let them cook down for about 5 minutes until they just start to go brown
  3. Add corn and toss with another sprinkle of salt, if you use frozen corn pop it in the microwave for 4 minutes and drain the excess water.  If you use canned corn drain the water before adding in the corn
  4. Cook additional 5 minutes
  5. Add water chestnuts, garlic powder and toss well
  6. Let cook 5 minutes and taste to see if you need to add more salt or pepper.  Toss the cilantro in right before serving

This can be served warm or at room temperature.  It would be a great dish to bring to a BBQ or house party since it doesn’t take long to make and packs a lot of flavor, and it’s healthy so you can feel good about getting a second (or third) helping.

October 4, 2011

Polenta with Bacon & Parmesean

This is a dish that will always remind me of home, and more importantly my mom.  She would make this for me on ‘special’ nights and to this day I’m still not sure why this was a ‘special’ dinner.  Either way, I enjoyed it and would hold off eating any snacks for the afternoon in anticipation of warm polenta topped with bacon and cheese.  This is a very easy, affordable dinner that only consists of 3 ingredients, can’t get much simpler than that!

There’s something warm and inviting about  creamy polenta when it’s fried up in a skillet.  It gets a delicate crisp coating on the outside, but the middle is smooth and creamy.  The Parmesan cheese slowly melts on top, and the crispy, salty bite from the bacon give the dish a nice change of texture.  It’s hard to imagine not liking this dish, after all it has bacon and cheese, what more could you want?  Give it a try; I hope you enjoy it as much as I do.

Ingredients

  • 1 round of pre-cooked polenta (you can make it from scratch but I like to make life easier)
  • 1 packet of bacon, trimmed of excess fat
  • 1/4 cup parmesan cheese (or 1/2 cup if you love it like me)
  • 1 tbsp. olive oil

Method

  • Preheat skillet to medium~high
  • Cut bacon into bite size pieces with scissors directly into the pan
  • Stir occasionally for about 10 minutes until the bacon is crisp
  • When the bacon is nice and crispy, use a slotted spoon to remove from pan and place on a plate lined with paper towel to drain the excess oils
  • Wipe out pan with paper towel and add 1 tbsp. of olive oil and return to medium~high heat (you can also use the bacon fat instead of olive oil, your choice)
  • While pan heats up, take the round of cold polenta and slice into 1 inch thick pieces
  • Once oil is hot, carefully place the cut rounds of polenta into skillet
  • Cook for 6-8 minutes until golden brown and turn
  • Brown other side for 6-8 mins
  • Remove from pan
  • To serve, place polenta on plate, sprinkle crumbled bacon and Parmesan cheese on top
  • YUMMMMMMMMMM!

If you make Polenta from scratch, the basic ratio for polenta is 4 parts liquid to 1 part polenta. I recommend making 2 cups polenta and add a teaspoon of salt, cook as normal and then pour it into a shallow dish to set in the fridge (takes 2-3 hours).  Then slice the polenta and fry up just as you did above.

September 3, 2011

Roasted Corn Perfected

Not only is this the easiest method I’ve found, I promise it will ensure you’ll always have perfectly crisp, flavorful corn.  I’ve always found heating up a huge pot of boiling water in the middle of the summer to be quite ironic.  It’s summer and I’m trying to stay cool… especially in Houston.  If I had kids I could employee to husk the corn, maybe I’d feel differently, but I hate doing it and would find trials of sink across my kitchen floor a week later.  So, I found the easiest possible recipe and haven’t turned back.

Method

  • Preheat oven to 350 degrees F.
  • Soak the corn, in husk in cold water for 15 minutes.  This helps the corn stay moist and makes it much easier to peel when it’s ready.  I also cut off the very tip where the sink hangs out, if you leave it on it tens to smoke and burn in the oven
  • Pull the corn out of the water and place directly on the over rack and roast for 30-35 minutes until the corn is soft.
  • Peel down the husks and use as a handle when eating.  Coat with butter, salt and pepper.  Enjoy!
  • If you’re looking to liven up your corn, here are a few ideas to get you started.

Savory Butter
3/4 c. soft butter
2 1/2 tsp. salt
1 1/2 tsp. dried oregano
1/2 tsp. garlic salt
2 tsp. chopped chives or minced green onion

Rosemary Butter
1/2 cup softened butter
1 teaspoon salt
1/2 teaspoon rosemary
1/2 teaspoon marjoram

Spicy Parmesan
1 cup shredded Parmesan cheese                                                                                                                                                                                    1 tablespoon chili powder
1 teaspoon salt
1 teaspoon ground black pepper
1/4 cup Mayonnaise

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