Posts tagged ‘potatoes’

September 25, 2011

Seared Petrale Sole

Growing up in San Francisco I was lucky to have access to come of the best fish in the country, one of my favorites is Petrale sole.  It’s a lean white fish about ½ an inch thick, with a mild favor that’s easily enhanced with mild spices and warm butter.  Petrale sole is exclusively found in the Pacific Ocean, but it’s close relative the Dover sole is more common on the east coast.  Both are beautifully delicate fish, perfect for a light dinner as we near the end of summer.

The key to cooking fish is cook it fast and don’t mess with it.  Fish already has great flavor, so I try to keep my methods and spices simple as to not overwhelm the natural taste.  I like to add a little touch of heat with either red pepper flakes or cayenne, but be light handed.  Good luck, and I hope you enjoy!

Ingredients

  • 1 lb. Petrale sole
  • 2/3 cup flour
  • 1/3 cup semolina flour
  • 1 tsp. paprika
  • 1/2 tsp. cayenne pepper
  • 1 tbsp. butter
  • 1 tsp. olive oil
  • 1 tsp. salt
  • 1 tsp. pepper
  • Slice of lemon for garnish

Method

  • Mix flour, semolina, paprika, cayenne, salt and pepper on a shallow plate.  I find it easier to dust the fish on a plate vs a bowl, and you also use up less flour in the process.
  • Preheat non stick frying pan to medium-high heat and add butter and olive oil
  • While the pan heats, lay the fish in the flour mixture and coat evenly.  It’s not like a batter, so it won’t be a thick layer, just an even dusting
  • Once the butter begins to foam, add fish and cook for 3 minutes
  • Flip and cook an additional 3 minutes.  Petrale sole is very thin, so it doesn’t take long.  You’re looking for a golden brown color on either side, which will give it a nice crust
  • Remove from pan and serve with a salad and potatoes

While I always encourage grilling, I would recommend it in this case.  Petrale sole will fall apart on the grill as it usually comes without skin and won’t stand up on the wire rack.  Leave grilling for something more hearty like salmon or tuna.

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September 21, 2011

Simply Grilled Steak with Wasabi Mashed Potatoes

Want a new spin on your traditional steak and potatoes?  Try adding a little wasabi!  The buttery potatoes have a slow-rising, distinctive heat, which contrasts well with the juicy steak.  In the summertime, there’s nothing quite like as satisfying as the smell of a big juice steak grilling over a hot fire.  One of my favorite things in the perfectly charred crust, all the seasoning from the grill in one perfect bite.   The grill may just be the best thing that ever happened to a steak.

To make my life a little easier, I bought mixed baby potatoes so I could avoid both peeling and chopping.  I also like the look of the potatoes skins mashed in, it makes it feel more rustic and the skins contain many essential nutrients, so why throw that away?   On a side note, I had a bad experience with my disposal and potato skins, so I try to avoid peeling at all costs… you can probably guess  how that turned out.  The small potatoes have a rich buttery texture so you have to add less milk and butter to get them to the right consistency.

Open up a nice bottle of red wine, relax, and enjoy your $40 steak house dinner in the comfort of your own home for a quarter of the price.

Ingredients

  • 2 rib-eyes, about 2 inches thick, ours we’re BIG steaks, so if you get smaller ones you’ll need to shorten the cooking time.  Here’s a helpful link on grilling steaks.
  • 1 tsp. salt per steak
  • 1 tsp. fresh cracked pepper per steak
  • 2 lbs. baby potatoes, washed (if they are varying in size, cut the large ones so they are all about the same, this way they cook at the same rate)
  • 1 1/2 tbsp. wasabi (this varies depending on the heat you want, add a little less at first and try it, you can always add more but you can’t take it away)
  • 3 tbsp. butter
  • 1/4 cup heavy whipping cream
  • 1/3 – 1/2 cup milk
  • Salt to taste
  • Fresh ground pepper to taste

Method

  • Remove steaks from fridge 30 minutes before cooking and season well with salt and pepper.  Rub the spices in so they don’t fall off on the grill.  Then put them aside and let them warm up to room temperature.
  • Fill a medium size pot half full and bring to a boil on the stove
  • Once the water is boiling, add a generous portion of salt (at least a tablespoon) and add the potatoes.
  • Leave potatoes on a light boil with the lid off for 15-20 minutes.  Check by sticking them with a knife, it is goes in without pressure they’re done.
  • While the potatoes boil, turn grill on high
  • When the grill is hot, place steaks on rack and cook on high (~500F) for 5 min per side to sear
  • Then turn grill down to medium (~350-400F) and cook an additional 7 min per side to cook the middle
  • If you use a meat thermometer (which you should feel no shame in using, especially if you are new to cooking meat) 130F in the middle is medium-rare, 140 is medium.  It’s only about 1-2 minutes difference on the grill!
  • Pull the meat off and let is rest for 5-10 minutes before serving, this allows the meat juices to redistribute.  If you cut into it immediately all the juice will run out and you’ll be left with dry steak.
  • While the meat rests, it’s mashing time!
  • Add cream, butter, salt and pepper (to taste) and mash.  Please please please, buy yourself a 4 dollar masher.  Please do not use an electric mixer, this beaks up the gluten in the potatoes and leaves you with tacky, sticky textured potatoes.
  • Slowly add the milk, add about ¼ – ½ a cup, more or less depending on the texture you’re looking for.  I don’t mash my potatoes until they are completely creamy, I like a little texture, so a few lumps are ok with me… plus the skin helps give it a rustic feel.
  • Add the wasabi at the end and mix with a spoon, add it slowly and taste as you go along to get the appropriate heat level for you and your guests.  I didn’t want to use the powdered wasabi I found in the grocery store (maybe one of you have tried it, and if so please let me know how it is), so I stopped by my local Japanese restaurant and asked them for a small side of wasabi.
  • Once you’re finished mashing, your meat has rested and you are ready to dig in.
  • Enjoy!

 

September 20, 2011

Braised Short Ribs in Red Wine

Time to switch up the usual Sunday pot roast for braised short ribs.  Similar to pot roast, this is a one pot meal that takes little time to prepare but yields unbelievable results.  I’m always amazed at the complexity of flavor that evolves without having to do anything but stick it in a pot, pop it in the oven and forget about it until dinner.

This would be great for a dinner party, since you can prep everything ahead of time and take it out of the oven when your guests arrive.  You could even make it the day before and then reheat it on the stove, my only recommendation would be to test the broth the second day to make sure it didn’t concentrate too much, if so, just add a little chicken or beef stock.  The depth of flavor develops as it braises, and it’s almost impossible to over cook.  Who doesn’t like fall off the bone ribs?  Pop in some carrots and potatoes after a few hours and they will cook in the meat juices… there you have it, a side dish!

I used this recipe as a starting point as this was my first time braising short ribs.  It was quite complex, so I decided to take a few shortcuts and modified the ingredients.   Slow-Braised Short Ribs, Lardons, and Baby Vegetables 

Ingredients

  • 5 lbs. beef short ribs (mine were bone out, but bone in will help develop a richer flavor so that would be my recommendation if I make this again)
  • 1 1/2 teaspoons salt
  • 1/2 teaspoon pepper
  • 2 tablespoons olive oil
  • 1 large onion, coarsely chopped
  • 2 small jalapeno peppers, finely diced
  • 4 cloves garlic, diced
  • 3 tablespoons tomato paste
  • 1 1/2 cup red wine
  • 1/3 cup red-wine vinegar
  • 1 quart chicken or beef stock
  • 1 cup water
  • 1 beef bouillon cube
  • 3 fresh thyme sprigs
  • 6 fresh sage leaves, finely chopped
  • 3 fresh rosemary sprigs, finely chopped
  • 2 dried bay leaves
  • 3 handfuls baby carrots (or 3 large carrots, diced)
  • 2 handfuls of small potatoes

Method

  • Preheat oven to 325°F.
  • Make sure ribs are dry, and sprinkle with salt and pepper.
  • Heat oil in a wide 6-8 quart heavy pot over medium-high heat, then brown ribs on all sides.  I used tongs to turn them every 4-5 minutes and sear them on each side.  When done, remove from the pot and leave them on a plate until later.
  • In the same pan, reduce heat to medium and add onion, jalapeño, garlic and sprinkle with salt.  Cook about 6 minutes until the onions are translucent.
  • Stir in tomato paste, red wine, vinegar, stock and water and bring to a light boil for 5 minutes.
  • Add bullion cube, thyme, rosemary, sage and bay leaf and simmer for 5 minutes.
  • Add ribs back to the pot along with any juices.
  • Cover pot tightly and transfer to oven.
  • Braise ribs until meat is very tender, 2 1/2 to 3 hours.
  • After 2 hours, add carrots and potatoes and continue to cook.
  • Remove from oven when meat is tender, stick a fork in it and twist, if it moves easily it’s done.
  • Let stand, uncovered, until fat rises to surface, about 15 minutes, then skim fat with a metal spoon.
  • Pull chunks off meat off with tongs and serve in a bowl.  Remember to grab some off the potatoes and carrots and spoon on lots of broth.

We had this over the weekend, and the meat was perfectly tender and had amazing flavor.  I served it on a plate with a side of potatoes, carrots and zucchini hash.  In the process of cleaning up I took a spoonful of broth to see how it tasted on it’s own and it was AMAZING!  I highly recommend serving this in a bowl (I put it on a plate so I didn’t get enough broth but will know better next time).  The broth is where all the wonderful flavor lies, you can taste the garlic, herbs, meat juices…. it’s divine.  I’d treat this more like a meaty stew so you get a good portion of brothy goodness to meaty ribs.

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